OFFER: “Love is the compass I use to fight for a fair society”

Perfectly. We are in a society that divides clothes into “men’s clothes” and “women’s clothes” and accepts it as irrelevant, even if it is a political choice.

Anyone – any body – can wear a skirt or dress. Fashion advertising leads us to believe that there is only a limited way to look and dress like a man or woman, when in fact there is no standard, there is only your way.

People think I’m a politician to dress the way I do, but I think it’s important to change focus.

What is political is that brands determine for us what a man or woman looks and acts like.

Pride-washing or queer-washing is done by many brands. How do you define these words and how do you choose which brands to use during Pride month?

This happens when brands only see LGBTQ people as potential customers, not people.

This is not honest because brands have always cared about profiting our human rights.

It’s not enough for brands to have Pride-focused sales, they need to donate to LGBTQ organizations and invest in our communities.

This is an important factor that determines the brands I choose to work with during Pride: the impact on excellence.

I grew up hating myself – feeling like I didn’t deserve this land. As part of my recovery journey, I learned to embrace and accept myself.

You’re frankly talking about the loss of your aunt Urvashi Vaid, a lesbian icon who has done a lot for queer rights since the 90s. What do you want people to remember about her life as an activist?

Urvashi taught me that we should not disregard any of our rights. They fought hard and won.

I hope people learn from him that we can’t be complacent.

We need to remain vigilant and strong and continue to push for a society where LGBTQ people are safe.

The way you brutally talk about love is, I think, one of the many reasons why so many people feel connected to the way you view the world and, also, why so many people use and violent and angry at what you said. . How do you develop this rhetoric of love?

I grew up hating myself – feeling like I didn’t deserve this land. As part of my recovery journey, I learned to embrace and accept myself.

How did I get here? That wouldn’t embarrass me. This is through the training of self -compassion. To be patient and empathize with myself.

I have seen with my own eyes how compassion can be a factor in change. And that’s the commitment I’m trying to bring to my work: a real belief in people’s ability to change themselves.

Would you say that you use love as a tool in today’s struggles?

Perfectly. I think it’s so loud that the LGBTQ movement rallied with the phrase “love wins.” »

For love to win is more than just achieving same-sex marriage, it is about creating a more compassionate society where all people are incarnated and given their dignity, their complexity and their happiness. Love is the compass I use to fight for a more just society. He is not passive, he is relentless in his search for justice.

I want to create spaces for trans joy, for trans people to celebrate. Plus, I’ll be performing in Paris on July 8th!

What do you want to focus on this month of Pride?

I want to focus on the increase in violence and discrimination against transgender and gender non-conforming people.

Trans and gender non-conforming people in my country face the worst discriminatory legislation ever.

We are being used as goats for political purposes and that is very worrying. Despite the fact that trans and gender non-conforming communities started Pride, we are still the ones left. That’s why I’m on a world tour this Pride season.

I want to create spaces for trans joy, for trans people to celebrate. Plus, I’ll be performing in Paris on July 8th!

Thanks to pop culture, many LGBTQ+ people have provided a mainstream platform for real struggle. Is there a cultural project that has had a positive impact on you?

Seeing the success of the POSE series has been very important to me. Watching trans women come alive, lead and thrive in and out of the screen through the show is empowering.

What does the word “pride” mean to you? Is there a difference between the two?

Pride about loving ourselves as LGBTQ people is more than not hating us in society. It’s about making the daily choice of love rather than fear.

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