Trial of the attacks on November 13: the period of requisitions

They are three must. For three days, an unusually long time, representatives of the National Anti-Terrorist Prosecutor’s Office (Pnat), Camille Hennetier, Nicolas Braconnay and Nicolas Le Bris, will stand, from this Wednesday, take turns to show whether what they considered to be the responsibilities of the 14 defendants were before the special assize court in Paris, and of the six others convicted without them.

With a goal that is both educational and demonstrative, they will first try to put together a puzzle in the case of the attacks of November 13, 2015, which left 130 dead and hundreds injured in Paris and Saint-Denis. They will then request the sentences on Friday. Twelve of the defendants face life in prison.

Incompressible perpetuity

A huge task in which magistrates must, at the same time, take into account the tragic facts that have traumatized the country, the strong emotional guilt of some 2,500 civil parties, but of course also the law and the complex personalities of 14 defendants are present.

Will these nine-month trials change the prosecution’s view of them? And especially with their lead Salah Abdeslam suffering from irrevocable life imprisonment-a unique punishment that makes any sentence adjustment very difficult? Nothing is less certain.

The speech and behavior of the lone survivor of the November 13 kamikaze commandos improved during debates, or rather changing, alternating challenges of bravado and tears of guilt, yawyaw warriors and comments on shocking ban.

Apologies to the victims

On September 8 at the opening of the debates, after maintaining a tough silence over five years of investigation, Salah Abdeslam presented himself as an “Islamic State fighter”. The attacks, he said, were only a response to the French bombing of Syria and Iraq.

A few months later, he admitted he had “surrendered”, “from the people”, to activate his explosive belt at a bar in the 18th arrondissement of Paris. He then presented, with tears in his eyes, his “apology” to the victims.

A story that left the public prosecutor in doubt. The prosecution has always favored the thesis of the malfunction of the explosive belt he wore that night over the dismissal. Similarly, the Advocates General considered it “incongruous” that he was recruited, he said, just two days before the attacks.

Hard to believe

Equally “surprising” was this “café” which was said to have been targeted but not identified by the accused, and was not found anywhere in the documents listing the “targets”, such as the Paris metro, discovered on a cell computer. to the jihadist. .

Hard to believe, while the commandos of the Stade de France, the terraces of Paris and the Bataclan were each composed of three men, while Salah Abdeslam was acting “alone”, he unlike the others had never go to training in Syria.

After the requirements, the floor will be given to the defense from June 13. The verdict is expected on June 29.

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The sentences served on 20 defendants at the Nov. 13 trial

The twenty accused in the attempted attacks on Nov. 13 face sentences ranging from six years in prison to life in prison.

Here is a reminder of the offenses they have committed and of the punishments they have suffered (with the AFP).

Salah Abdeslam:

The main accused in the trial, Frenchman Salah Abdeslam, 32, son of Moroccan immigrants established in Belgium, was the only surviving member of the commandos.

He was charged with 5 offenses for which he faces life imprisonment: participation in a criminal terrorist association; killings of an organized gang, in connection with a terrorist business (Bataclan, terraces, Stade de France); attempted murder of an organized gang, in connection with a terrorist enterprise (Bataclan, terraces, Stade de France); kidnappings, without voluntary release before the seventh day, of an organized gang and in connection with a terrorist business (Bataclan); tried to kill people holding public authority, in an organized gang, in connection with a terrorist business (Bataclan)

Mohammad Abrini:

The childhood friend of the Abdeslam brothers, Belgian Mohamed Abrini, 37, who was with commandos in the Paris region a day before the attacks, faces life in prison. .

He was charged with 5 offenses: participation in a criminal terrorist conspiracy; complicity in the killings of an organized gang, in connection with a terrorist business (Bataclan, terraces, Stade de France); complicity in the attempted murder of an organized gang, in connection with a terrorist business (Bataclan, terraces, Stade de France); conspiracy to kidnap, without voluntary release before the seventh day, of an organized gang and in connection with a terrorist business (Bataclan); complicity in the attempted murder of people holding public authority, by an organized gang, in connection with a terrorist business (Bataclan)

Mohammad Amri:

Belgian-Moroccan Mohammed Amri, 33, admitted to going to pick up Salah Abdeslam in the car the night of the attacks to bring him back to Belgium.

He was charged with 2 offenses for which he suffered twenty years of criminal imprisonment: membership in a terrorist criminal association; terrorist concealment in relation to terrorist business

Yassine Atar:

Osama Atar’s brother, the alleged sponsor of the attacks convicted by default, Belgian Yassine Atar, 35, met Khalid El Bakraoui and Mohamed Bakkali, both involved in the preparation of the attacks, in Brussels the day before the attacks.

He is accused of participating in a criminal conspiracy to terrorize, a crime for which he faces life imprisonment.

Hamza Attou:

He was one of three defendants appearing at large under judicial supervision. Belgian Hamza Attou, 28, accompanied Mohammed Amri in the search for Salah Abdeslam in Paris on the night of the attacks.

He is accused of hiding a terrorist in connection with a terrorist business, an offense for which he faces six years in criminal prison.

Sofian Ayari:

Tunisian Sofien Ayari, 28, was Salah Abdeslam’s running mate in Belgium after the attacks. Investigators suspect he wanted to carry out or prepare, along with Osama Krayem, an attack on the Amsterdam-Schipol airport on the night of the Paris attacks.

He was charged with 5 offenses for which he faces life imprisonment: participation in a criminal terrorist association; complicity in the killings of an organized gang, in connection with a terrorist business (Bataclan, terraces, Stade de France); complicity in the attempted murder of an organized gang, in connection with a terrorist business (Bataclan, terraces, Stade de France); conspiracy to kidnap, without voluntary release before the seventh day, of an organized gang and in connection with a terrorist business (Bataclan); complicity in the attempted murder of people holding public authority, by an organized gang, in connection with a terrorist business (Bataclan)

Osama Krayem:

Like Sofien Ayari, she was Salah Abdeslam’s running mate in Brussels after the attacks on November 13. During the trial, the 29-year-old Swede generally refused to show up.

He was charged with 5 offenses for which he faces life imprisonment: participation in a criminal terrorist association; complicity in the killings of an organized gang, in connection with a terrorist business (Bataclan, terraces, Stade de France); complicity in the attempted murder of an organized gang, in connection with a terrorist business (Bataclan, terraces, Stade de France); conspiracy to kidnap, without voluntary release before the seventh day, of an organized gang and in connection with a terrorist business (Bataclan); complicity in the attempted murder of people holding public authority, by an organized gang, in connection with a terrorist business (Bataclan)

Mohammad Bakkali:

Considered one of the commando’s logisticians, Belgian Mohamed Bakkali, 35, was accused of renting cars for the attacks.

He was charged with 5 offenses for which he faces life imprisonment: participation in a criminal terrorist association; complicity in the killings of an organized gang, in connection with a terrorist business (Bataclan, terraces, Stade de France); complicity in the attempted murder of an organized gang, in connection with a terrorist business (Bataclan, terraces, Stade de France); conspiracy to kidnap, without voluntary release before the seventh day, of an organized gang and in connection with a terrorist business (Bataclan); complicity in the attempted murder of people holding public authority, by an organized gang, in connection with a terrorist business (Bataclan)

Abdellah Chouaa:

One of the three defendants appeared to be free under judicial supervision.

The 41-year-old Belgian has been charged with involvement in a criminal terrorist conspiracy, an offense for which he faces up to twenty years in criminal prison.

Ali El Haddad Asufi:

The 36-year-old Belgian-Moroccan is accused of involvement in a criminal terrorist conspiracy, for which he faces twenty years in criminal prison.

Adel Haddadi and Muhammad Usman:

They were both arrested in December 2015 at a migrant home in Austria. Algerian Adel Haddadi, 34, and Pakistani Muhammad Usman, 29, left Syria and arrived in Europe via the migrant route with two suicide bombers from the Stade de France.

They are accused of belonging to an association of criminal terrorists, an offense for which each of them carries a twenty-year criminal prison term.

Farid Kharkash:

He is accused of providing false Franco-Belgian cell papers involved in the attacks, at the request of Khalid El Bakraoui, one of the perpetrators of the Brussels attacks.

The 39-year-old Belgian-Moroccan is accused of joining a criminal terrorist association, for which he faces twenty years in criminal prison.

Ali Oulkadi:

One of the three defendants appeared to be free under judicial supervision.

This 37-year-old Frenchman is charged with two offenses for which he faces twenty years in criminal prison: participation in a criminal terrorist association; terrorist concealment in relation to terrorist business

Defendant attempted their absence:

Oussama Atar, likely killed in a Western strike in the Iraqi-Syrian zone in November 2017, Ahmad Alkhald (possibly Omar Darif), likely killed in an air raid in July 2017, Fabien and Jean-Michel Clain, likely killed in February or March 2019 in an airstrike in Syria, and Obeida Aref Dibo, likely killed in the bombing in February 2016, all five were jailed for life because justice had no formal proof of their deaths.

Ahmed Dahmani, a 33-year-old Belgian-Moroccan, is currently imprisoned in Turkey. He was charged with 5 offenses for which he faces life imprisonment.

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