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Road safety – Look and be seen: watch out for the winter weather!

Updated on 04/11/2021

As the transition to the winter season takes place on the night of October 30 to 31 in 2021, the attention of pedestrians, cyclists and users of personal motorized transport devices (EPDM) such as electric scooters and Segways, is called for by the importance of manufacturing. of yourself to be seen. on the roads.

Awareness raising operations in Lille

The road safety coordination service of the Nord prefecture is, this Thursday, October 28, 2021 in the afternoon, at the Place de la République in Lille, for an action that raises awareness of “Transition to winter time – Well seen to be together “.

Site staff thus made passersby aware of the dangers of reduced autumn light, road safety and presented a 2-wheel simulator, the bicycle helmet and the airbag vest. They also present useful accessories that can be seen in the dark: lamps, reflective armbands, etc …

What is impact of change during road accidents ?

As of September 30, 2021, 15 pedestrians lost their lives on the roads of the Nord department, ie 6 more than the 2017-2019 average for the same period, and the months of November and December are more lethal for this category of user.

Each year, this period is marked by a peak of accidents (20% increase in pedestrian accidents in the 7 am to 9 am time slot and 50% for the 5 pm to 7 pm time slot).

Reduced light imposes an increased risk on pedestrians, cyclists and scooter riders. Road pedestrian deaths actually reach their peak in the fall/winter: nearly half of the pedestrians killed each year between 2009 and 2020 were killed in the four months from November to February. The number of injured pedestrians (usually severe) will increase by 50% in the first weeks after the time change.

Proportion of pedestrians killed at night

Proportion of accidents at night

How to explain these numbers ?

If we move during the winter, the light will decrease, especially during important times like class outings and home trips. Drivers are less aware of these vulnerable users of the lanes. We need to be aware of the event and double our attention.

What behaviors should be used to limit the risk of an accident?

You have to surrender see with appropriate equipment:

from lighter clothes example
and satchels with reflective strips for children.

A pedestrian, a scooter rider or a cyclist should not think that, because he sees, he should be seen.

Pedestrians

• Use protected routes.

Pedestrian crossings remain the safest place to cross.

• Cross with caution.

Having the right of way does not mean ignoring the crossing, especially in the dark. Walk to the left side of the road to get a good view of oncoming traffic. As you cross, look left, right, then left again.

Cyclists, users of personal motorized transport vehicles (EPDM):

Stay visible by wearing a reflective accessory or light-colored clothing.

The simple fact of having a reflective accessory with you makes it possible to be seen earlier by motorists. In the car’s headlights, pedestrians can be seen from just 20 meters away when dressed in black. However, at 50 km/h, the car needs at least 25 meters to stop on dry ground (38 meters on wet ground). With reflective accessories, pedestrians can be seen from 150 meters away.

Since July 2020, electric scooter riderss should wear reflective clothing at night or if visibility decreases during the day.

Parents, also want lightweight clothes for your kids and school bags with retro-reflective accessories.

Protections

Motorists:

Slow down when approaching a pedestrian crossing

It’s best to plan ahead, wait and slow down before pedestrians cross, especially in the dark. You have to stop before the trail, as pedestrians are likely to see.

Respect the pedestrian priority

When approaching a crosswalk, hand over the pedestrian crossing or almost cross. You risk a fine of 135 euros and the loss of 6 points on your driver’s license if you do not comply with this obligation.

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